NB86-5: Michael Jordan’s second NBA season – November 24 through December 8, 1985 | Podcast

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Stan Albeck - Chicago Bulls

Adam & Aaron celebrate the 30th anniversary of Michael Jordan‘s second season in the National Basketball Association. This episode covers:

 

* NBA regular season – November 24 through December 8, 1985

* Insightful minutiae, all but lost to the annals of basketball history

 

In this episode, we discuss numerous happenings from the next 15-day block of the 1985-86 NBA season. The Chicago Bulls played nine games (all on the road) in this span – two wins and seven losses. 18 of the Bulls’ first 24 games, were away from home.

We chat about the increased productivity of Chicago’s Quintin Dailey. His scoring ability was needed more than ever, with Michael Jordan still on the sidelines. Never short of a post-game quote, Dailey had choice words about the Washington Bullets’ Darren Daye, after an incident with the Bulls’ John Paxson.

We also talk about the Boston Celtics’ tremendous early-season form. The team’s nine-game win streak was broken by the visiting Portland Trail Blazers – it would be the Celtics’ sole regular-season loss at home.

Stan Albeck (Chicago coach) extraordinarily asked permission from his regular starters, to have his four former-Spurs players, in the starting lineup, for the Bulls’ game at San Antonio. It worked beautifully, with each of the ex-Spurs having good performances.

Further, we discuss some scoring milestones. The Denver Nuggets’ Alex English racked up 15,000 career points, whilst the Cleveland Cavaliers’ World B. Free, surpassed 16,000 for his career.

This episode continues our coverage of the 1985-86 NBA season. We encourage your interaction. Feel free to suggest specific games, moments and events from within the season, for us to cover in future episodes of the series. Thanks for taking the time to listen to the show. If you enjoy the content, please share it with your friends!

Others mentioned in this episode, include: George Gervin, Fat Lever, Terence Stansbury, Adrian Dantley, Mel Turpin, Jawann Oldham, Herb Williams, Maurice Lucas & Jeff Ruland.

 

Chicago Bulls games discussed:

 

85-11-24 – Chicago Bulls @ Washington Bullets

85-11-26 – Chicago Bulls @ Denver Nuggets

85-11-27 – Chicago Bulls @ Utah Jazz

85-11-29 – Chicago Bulls @ Portland Trail Blazers

85-12-01 – Chicago Bulls @ Los Angeles Lakers

85-12-03 – Chicago Bulls @ Sacramento Kings

85-12-04 – Chicago Bulls @ Phoenix Suns

85-12-06 – Chicago Bulls @ San Antonio Spurs

85-12-07 – Chicago Bulls @ Houston Rockets

 

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AIR067: Mitchell Butler – High School All-American & eight-year NBA veteran | Podcast

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Mitchell Butler - Washington BulletsHigh School All-American and eight-year NBA veteran, Mitchell Butler.

 

High School: Oakwood, California

Mitchell reflects on his outstanding high school career. From 1987 to 1989, he was named the Southern Section Small Schools Division, Player of the Year. In 1988, he led Oakwood to the (Liberty League) Division Championship, notching an astonishing 47 points, 19 rebounds, 4 steals and 2 blocks, in his team’s 61-60 victory. We talk about his 1988 quarterfinal game, where he tallied a staggering 50, of his team’s 55 points, in an eight-point win (55-47).

In November of 1988 – in the early-signing period ahead of his senior year at high school – Mitchell signed a letter of intent with the UCLA Bruins. He discusses how heavily he was recruited and what led him to ultimately choose the Bruins.

Mitchell also talks about his 1989 (Third Team) All-American selection.

 

College: University of California Los Angeles

Years: 1989-90 – 1992-93 | Coach: Jim Harrick

At the time of recording our conversation, Mitchell ranked sixth all-time, in total games played (130) for the UCLA Bruins. Whilst researching for our chat, I discovered that in the last warm-up game (November, 1989) prior to his freshman season, Butler’s Bruins played against my fellow countrymen, the Australian Boomers. UCLA defeated the Aussies, 80-68, at Pauley Pavilion.

Mitchell played in the NCAA Tournament, in each of his four seasons. We chat about his freshman campaign, where he made it to the Sweet Sixteen, against Duke – the eventual National Finalists (who lost to UNLV). As a sophomore, Butler started almost every game, before the Bruins were upset by Penn State in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. We discuss how close Mitchell came to transferring from UCLA after that second season. UCLA made it to the Elite Eight, in 1992, before losing out to Calbert Cheaney and his Indiana Hoosiers. Though it was a disappointing end to the season, Mitchell won his team’s Player Improvement Award, due to his all-around play and positive mental attitude. As a senior, he was named team captain and also enjoyed (arguably) his best season as a Bruin, with 9.5 points, 5.3 rebounds and 2.3 assists per game. We cover UCLA’s near-upset of Michigan’s Fab Five, in a classic, second-round overtime game, in the 1993 NCAA Tournament.

 

1993 NBA Draft

Date: June 30 | Location: Auburn Hills | Pick: Undrafted

We talk about the circumstances behind Mitchell being overlooked on draft day, and how he made his way into the league, in the months that followed.

 

NBA / Euro / ABA / CBA career | Years: 1993-94 – 2003-04

Seasons: 1993-94 – 1995-96 | Team: Washington Bullets

Coaches: Wes Unseld & Jim Lynam

Individually, Mitchell’s best NBA seasons were his first two in the league, averaging almost eight points and three rebounds, in just 19 minutes per game. We cover his first stint with Washington and links to Australian legend – and former podcast guest – Andrew Gaze. Butler twice scored an NBA-career high of 26 points. Mitchell describes the feeling of being ‘on fire’.

 

Thanks to a tip-off from great friend of the podcast, Jim McIlvaine, I ask Mitchell about his acting career. We briefly discuss his roles in Blue Chips (1994) & Rebound: The Legend of Earl ‘The Goat’ Manigault (1996). Mitchell talks about his involvement with Space Jam (1996), however, his scenes were ultimately cut from the movie.

 

Season: 1996-97 | Team: Portland Trail Blazers

Coach: P.J. Carlesimo

Prior to the 1997 season, Washington traded Mitchell (along with Rasheed Wallace) to Portland, in return for Harvey Grant and Rod Strickland. We talk about Mitchell’s thoughts on the deal. Butler made it to the playoffs for the first time in his NBA career – playing limited minutes in a four-game series loss to the L.A. Lakers. He talks about how it felt to be part of a playoff team.

 

Seasons: 1997-98 – 1998-99 | Team: Cleveland Cavaliers

Coach: Mike Fratello

Mitchell signed as a free agent with Cleveland. Barely a month into the season, he suffered significant neck and shoulder problems, leading to surgery. He talks about the impact the injury had on his career, and how he dealt with news that he’d miss the rest of the season.

Following the lockout-shortened 1999 season, Butler wouldn’t return to the NBA until the 2001-02 campaign. During that gap in his NBA résumé, he headed overseas and played in Lithuania, before returning home and playing in the American Basketball Association (not related to the original ABA, I should add).

 

Season: 2001-02 | Team: Portland Trail Blazers

Coach: Maurice Cheeks

Mitchell returned to the Trail Blazers franchise, signing as a free agent. He discusses what it was like to be back in the NBA and how his second time with the team, differed so much to his 1997 season.

Prior to his final season in the NBA, Mitchell was a key member of the Continental Basketball Association’s (CBA) Yakima Sun Kings. His team won the 2003 Championship. He reflects fondly on his time in the league.

 

Season: 2003-04 | Team: Washington Wizards

Coach: Eddie Jordan

Butler closed out his NBA-playing career, returning to suit up for the Washington Wizards. We chat about his final season, what opportunities presented themselves and whether he could have played on, beyond 2004.

 

Mitchell featured in a number of Top 10 Plays on NBA Action. I asked him to choose his favorite move and he certainly didn’t disappoint.

 

I ask Mitchell to recall “The Game I’ll Never Forget”. In a first for the podcast, he shares three-memorable games – one each from high school, college and the NBA.

We discuss Mitchell’s career in basketball since he retired as a player. He’s been involved in various roles, most recently, accepting a position as a sports agent at Jackson Management Group (owned by Phil Jackson‘s son, Charles).

Our conversation rounds out with a quick chat about the significance of Mitchell’s jersey numbers.

People mentioned in this episode, include: Michael Adams, Tyus Edney, Darrick Martin, Chris Webber, Jim McIlvaine, Vernon MaxwellAllan Houston, Kenny Anderson, Tracy Murray, James Robinson & Ed O’Bannon.

 

Editor’s note: sign-up for the monthly newsletter – receive exclusive details on upcoming podcast episodes and future, high-profile guests to appear on the show.

 

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AIR066: Peter Capolino – Founder, Mitchell & Ness Nostalgia Company. Trailblazer of authentic Throwback Jerseys | Podcast

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Peter Capolino (Founder, Mitchell & Ness Nostalgia Company) and Fabolous

Founder of Mitchell & Ness Nostalgia Company, Peter Capolino.

We talk about Peter’s family and its relationship to sports. Peter’s father, Sisto – later renamed James, by original founders, Frank Mitchell and Charles Ness – began work with Mitchell & Ness (1917), at just 13 years of age. In the early 1950s, Sisto purchased the business, bringing Peter into the fold.

Peter describes the meticulous research conducted, allowing Mitchell & Ness to produce such high quality, throwback uniforms. Countless hours were spent, combing through archival newspapers, visiting libraries, museums and numerous sporting halls of fame. We discuss the advances in technology and its impact on how the business manufactured apparel.

In 1998, Peter was asked to recreate the history of the NBA (Hardwood Classics), as he had done with MLB’s Cooperstown Collection. Peter discusses how he obtained licences for each professional league (including the NFL and NHL), allowing him to produce historically-accurate uniforms.

Just before the turn of the millennium, Mitchell & Ness Nostalgia Company’s profile exploded, thanks is large part to links with hip-hop and rap artists. Peter shares some stories about Big Boi and André 3000 (Outkast), plus the classic background behind the improbable link between one of his favorite footballers, Sammy Baugh, and Jay Z.

Peter also elaborates on the deal he struck with Michael Jordan, getting the licence and exclusive rights to reproduce MJ’s Chicago Bulls jerseys.

Sports Illustrated has published three-prominent features – Baseball Flannels are Hot (1987), Throwback Hip-Hop Style Points (2002) and Rockin’ the Retros (2003) – on Mitchell & Ness Nostalgia Company.

Peter sold Mitchell & Ness Nostalgia Company to Adidas, in 2008 – continuing to work for them, a further four years – and still consults with the company today. This conversation is a must-listen for fans of any major-league sport.

People mentioned in this episode, include: Tom Gola, Connie Simmons, Bill Russell, Rick Barry, Bill Walton, Richie Ashburn, Dale Murphy, Nolan Ryan, Allen Iverson, Wilt Chamberlain, Mickey Mantle, Lou Gehrig, Roy Sievers, & Bob Skinner.

 

Editor’s note: sign-up for the monthly newsletter – receive exclusive details on upcoming podcast episodes and future, high-profile guests to appear on the show.

 

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NB86-4: Michael Jordan’s second NBA season – November 9 through 23, 1985 | Podcast

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George Gervin - Chicago Bulls

Adam & Aaron celebrate the 30th anniversary of Michael Jordan‘s second season in the National Basketball Association. This episode covers:

 

* NBA regular season – November 9 through 23, 1985

* Insightful minutiae, all but lost to the annals of basketball history

 

In this episode, we discuss numerous happenings from the second 15-day block of the 1985-86 NBA season. The Chicago Bulls played eight games in this span – three wins and five losses.

We chat about the Bulls’ transition from its heavy reliance on (recently injured) Michael Jordan. Chicago was trying to adapt to not having MJ on the floor – this allowed star, Orlando Woolridge, to mesh with lesser-known talents like Sidney Green, Dave Corzine, Jawann Oldham and Kyle Macy; assuming more responsibility for the team’s fortunes.

Kyle Macy - Chicago Bulls
 

We also talk about the role that Michael Jordan played, helping the North Carolina Tar Heels, secure the signature of Scott Williams (future three-time NBA Champion).

Jordan helped secure Williams' UNC signing

 

Further, we discuss the Lakers’ best start to a season since the franchise moved to Los Angeles in 1960, Quintin Dailey‘s return to playing duty, Alex English‘s 54-point explosion versus Houston, Xavier McDaniel‘s cameo in (1992 movie) Singles and much more.


 

This episode continues our coverage of the 1985-86 NBA season. We encourage your interaction. Feel free to suggest specific games, moments and events from within the season, for us to cover in future episodes of the series. Thanks for taking the time to listen to the show. If you enjoy the content, please share it with your friends!

Others mentioned in this episode, include: George GervinSteve Stipanovich, Ken Bannister, Bill Walton, Terry Cummings, Mychal Thompson & Derrick Gervin.

 

Chicago Bulls games discussed:

 

Box Score: Nov 9, 1985 – Chicago Bulls @ New York Knicks

Box Score: Nov 12, 1985 – Milwaukee Bucks @ Chicago Bulls

Box Score: Nov 13, 1985 – Chicago Bulls @ Philadelphia 76ers

Box Score: Nov 15, 1985 – Chicago Bulls @ Milwaukee Bucks

Box Score: Nov 16, 1985 – Cleveland Cavaliers @ Chicago Bulls

Box Score: Nov 19, 1985 – Indiana Pacers @ Chicago Bulls

Box Score: Nov 20, 1985 – Chicago Bulls @ Atlanta Hawks

Box Score: Nov 23, 1985 – Golden State Warriors @ Chicago Bulls

 

Editor’s note: sign-up for the monthly newsletter – receive exclusive details on upcoming podcast episodes and future, high-profile guests to appear on the show.

 

I appreciate all feedback, FB Page ‘Likes’ and iTunes ratings / reviews.

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Feedback: e-mail (audio welcome) | Voicemail

NB86-3: Michael Jordan’s second NBA season – October 25 through November 8, 1985 | Podcast

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Michael Jordan - sidelined with a broken foot

Adam & Aaron celebrate the 30th anniversary of Michael Jordan‘s second season in the National Basketball Association. This episode covers:

 

* NBA regular season – October 25 through November 8, 1985

* Insightful minutiae, all but lost to the annals of basketball history

 

In this episode, we discuss numerous happenings from the first 15 days of the 1985-86 NBA season. The Chicago Bulls played seven games in this span – three wins and four losses. Without doubt, the biggest news of the young season, was Michael Jordan‘s fractured left foot – initially reported to be a ‘jammed ankle’ – suffered in the team’s third game. He’d miss 64 regular-season games.

We chat about Larry Bird‘s near quadruple-double that opened the Celtics’ season. That same game was also Bill Walton‘s debut with Boston. We also talk about the great play of the L.A. Clippers’ Derek Smith, who lit up the newly-relocated Sacramento Kings, for 36 points. Patrick Ewing made his NBA debut, however, suffered more losses in his first two weeks as a pro (seven), than he did in his entire senior season at Georgetown (three).

Further, we discuss John Paxson signing with the Bulls and Manute Bol‘s first NBA points. Also, we mention 40-plus point performances from Mark Aguirre, Alex English and Akeem Olajuwon, chat about Chris Mullin‘s heroics in his first regular-season game and much more.

This episode continues our coverage of the 1985-86 NBA season. We encourage your interaction. Feel free to suggest specific games, moments and events from within the season, for us to cover in future episodes of the series. Thanks for taking the time to listen to the show. If you enjoy the content, please share it with your friends!

Others mentioned in this episode, include: Buck Williams, Terence Stansbury, Wes Matthews & Georgi Glouchkov.

 

Chicago Bulls games discussed:

 

Box Score: Oct 25, 1985 – Cleveland Cavailiers @ Chicago Bulls

Box Score: Oct 26, 1985 – Detroit Pistons @ Chicago Bulls

Box Score: Oct 29, 1985 – Chicago Bulls @ Golden State Warriors

Box Score: Oct 31, 1985 – Chicago Bulls @ L.A. Clippers

Box Score: Nov 2, 1985 – Chicago Bulls @ Seattle SuperSonics

Box Score: Nov 6, 1985 – Chicago Bulls @ Detroit Pistons

Box Score: Nov 7, 1985 – Chicago Bulls @ New Jersey Nets

 

Editor’s note: sign-up for the monthly newsletter – receive exclusive details on upcoming podcast episodes and future, high-profile guests to appear on the show.

 

I appreciate all feedback, FB Page ‘Likes’ and iTunes ratings / reviews.

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Feedback: e-mail (audio welcome) | Voicemail

AIR065: Eddie Nealy – Kansas State standout & 10-year NBA veteran | Podcast

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Eddie Nealy

Kansas State Wildcats standout and 10-year NBA veteran, Eddie Nealy.

[Note: whilst mostly known as ‘Ed’, I refer to him throughout, as Eddie]

 

High School: Bonner Springs, Kansas

Eddie’s father was his high school basketball coach. He describes what it was like to have his dad calling the shots. The main focus was an emphasis on developing the fundamentals of his game. This would prove vital, as Nealy’s longevity at the highest level was due in no small part, to his tireless work ethic and mastery of hustle.

 

College: Kansas State University

Years: 1978-79 – 1981-82 | Coach: Jack Hartman

Nealy was a two-time Academic All-American, largely recruited by two schools – Yale and Kansas State. He talks about the reasoning behind his decision to play for the Wildcats. We also chat about a major role that he played in a fantastic game, in his freshman season. He hit crucial free throws to seal victory in the closing seconds.

Eddie’s Wildcats made it to the NCAA Tournament, in three of his four college seasons. In 1981, they advanced to the Elite Eight. I ask Eddie to talk about some key memories from his time at Kansas State, which also included an oversea tour to Japan, prior to senior season. Nealy left college with averages of 10.6 points and 8.7 rebounds per game. For three of those seasons, he was teammates with the great Rolando Blackman. We cover his recollections of teaming with the future, four-time NBA All-Star.

Eddie Nealy - Kansas State Wildcats

 

1982 NBA Draft

Date: June 29 | Location: New York | Pick: 166 (Round 8) | Team: Kansas City Kings

We talk about Eddie’s draft-day whereabouts and how he first heard the news that he was an NBA draftee. He also reflects on what it meant to be selected by his home-state team.

 

NBA / CBA career | Years: 1982-83 – 1992-93

Seasons: 1982-83 – 1984-85 | Team: Kansas City Kings

Coaches: Cotton Fitzsimmons, Jack McKinney & Phil Johnson

Along with (former podcast guest) Eddie Johnson, Nealy played all 82 regular-season games in his rookie season. He recalls some memories from his first year in the league.

The following year – his first trip to the post-season – Eddie’s Kings lost to eventual NBA Finalists, the L.A. Lakers. Nealy talks about his experiences playing the might of the L.A. Lakers.

After missing most of the Kings’ (1984-85) training camp, Eddie was released, signing on with the Continental Basketball Association’s (CBA) Sarasota Stingers – for part of the 1984-85 season – before signing as a free agent and returning to the Kansas City Kings, in late February, 1985. Following the Kings’ off-season relocation to Sacramento, Nealy was released by the team. He returned to the CBA and was a member of the 1986 CBA Champion, Tampa Bay Thrillers, led by Bill Musselman. Eddie fondly recalls his experiences playing in the CBA.

 

Seasons: 1986-87 – 1987-88 | Team: San Antonio Spurs

Coach: Bob Weiss

In mid-July, 1986, Nealy signed as a free agent with the San Antonio Spurs. He played with the team for two seasons. These days (2015), Eddie resides in Texas. We talk about his playing days in San Antonio and what it could have been like to play with David Robinson. Eddie also reflects on some former San Antonio teammates.

 

Season: 1988-89 | Teams: Chicago Bulls / Phoenix Suns

Coaches: Doug Collins / Cotton Fitzsimmons

Prior to the 1989 season, Nealy signed as a free agent with the Chicago Bulls. He played 13 games in his first stint as a Bull, before Chicago traded him to Phoenix (mid-December), in exchange for Craig Hodges. Eddie talks about the move to Chicago and how he responded to hearing news of a trade to the Valley of the Sun. He also recalls a great story from the Bulls’ practice court, involving him and Michael Jordan.

 

Season: 1989-90 | Team: Chicago Bulls

Coach: Phil Jackson

In October, 1989, Phoenix traded Eddie back to Chicago. He was a Bull for the second time. We discuss what he was thinking, when he learnt he was headed back to the Windy City. Nealy played a pivotal role in Chicago’s playoff run. We reminisce about Game 4 of the 1990 Eastern Conference Semi-Finals – Chicago at Philadelphia. Eddie had a terrific performance, scoring 9 points and pulling down 9 rebounds. Jordan torched the Sixers for 45 points. Nealy and Jordan were interviewed by Jim Gray (CBS), post-game.


 

Season: 1990-91 – 1991-92 | Team: Phoenix Suns

Coach: Cotton Fitzsimmons

Before the 1991 season, Eddie signed with Phoenix as a free agent. He played with the Suns for two seasons – an exciting team, with a very-promising future. We talk about his return to Phoenix.

 
Season: 1992-93 | Teams: Golden State Warriors / Chicago Bulls

Coaches: Don Nelson / Phil Jackson

Nealy was waived by Phoenix (early November, 1992), signing with the Warriors, later that same month. He played 30 games in Golden State, before – with the help of Don Nelson – they traded him back to Chicago, for his third stay as a member of the Bulls. After the regular season, the Bulls placed Eddie on the inactive roster. We discuss his memories of the 1993 season, his involvement with the team and how he felt, watching from the sidelines – particularly, when John Paxson launched his famous three-point shot that sealed Chicago’s 1993 NBA Championship.


 

I ask Eddie to recall “The Game I’ll Never Forget”.

In 2014, Nealy was inducted to the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame. We talk about how he felt to receive that great honor.

Phil Jackson once said that having Nealy on his roster, was like having another coach. We discuss Eddie’s (possible) opportunities missed and future coaching ambitions.

Our conversation rounds out with a quick chat about the significance (if any) of Eddie’s jersey numbers.

People mentioned in this episode, include: Charles Barkley, LaSalle Thompson, Kevin Johnson, Dan Majerle, Chris Mullin & Tim Hardaway.

 

Editor’s note: sign-up for the monthly newsletter – receive exclusive details on upcoming podcast episodes and future, high-profile guests to appear on the show.

 

I appreciate all feedback, FB Page ‘Likes’ and iTunes ratings / reviews.

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Feedback: e-mail (audio welcome) | Voicemail